• Japans Tritium fears get blasted by an EPRI researcher. Electric Power Research Institute’s Rosa Yang advises Japan on decommissioning reactors. Rosa believes the public angst over Tritium is uncalled-for. She says a Japanese government official should simply drink water from one of the tanks to convince people it’s safe. Japan’s leading nuke watchdog, Shunichi Tanaka’s statement about Tritium being essentially harmless is located at the very end of the article, “Tritium is so weak in its radioactivity it won’t penetrate plastic wrapping.” The AP tries to rebuff both by using Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt rhetoric (FUD). The topic has recently been given considerable Press thanks to NY Governor Cuomo relative to Indian Point nuclear station. Now, the topic is being extended to Fukushima by the Associated Press. http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other/japan-prepares-for-release-of-tritium-from-fukushima-plant/ar-BBrE9uL (For an objective, detailed explanation of Tritium and its innocuous biological impact, click on “Background Information on Tritium” in the left-hand menu.)
  • Tokyo considers lifting the evacuation order for most of Katsurao Village on June 12. This will allow 1,352 of the 1,470 residents to permanently repopulate, if they are willing. This includes as many as 62 residents who fled from the “residency-restricted” zone. This will mark the first Fukushima residency-restricted zone to have the evacuation orders lifted. So far, only 104 residents have applied for preparatory lodging at home. It is felt that the majority of Katsurao’s evacuees are awaiting a doctor to be assigned to the village medical clinic and a food store to be opened. Mayor Masahide Matsumoto says living conditions will be improved gradually so that evacuees can consider returning home with peace of mind. http://www.fukushimaminponews.com/news.html?id=655
  • Two Japanese research reactors’ safety measures are approved by Tokyo. These are the first research units to pass the post-Fukushima screenings of the Nuclear Regulation Authority. The first is the 100-Watt reactor at Kyoto University and the other a one-watt unit at Kinki University. Both are located in Osaka Prefecture. Research reactors with a maximum output below 500 watts are not required to have the same severe accident prevention measures as commercial nukes. http://jen.jiji.com/jc/eng?g=eco&k=2016041300539
  • Salmon fishing resumes in a Fukushima lake. Lake Numazawa in Kaneyama Town has had sockeye salmon fishing banned for more than four years. On April 9th, local fishermen dropped their lines into the crystal-blue waters for the first time since the ban. Mitsukatsu Sato, a 73-year-old angler from Motomiya City, caught more than 30 salmon by noon and said, “Sashimi (sliced raw fish) tastes like ‘toro’ (fatty tuna). I’ll come every day.” Fishing has been banned since April, 2012, when a salmon was found to have more than 100 Becquerels of Cesium per kilogram. Since none have exceeded the limit for more than a year-and-a-half, the ban was lifted. http://www.fukushimaminponews.com/news.html?id=656
  • The Press has finally found a Tepco executive who says he read the meltdown criterion in the company’s emergency manual before the nuke accident. Yuichi Okamura, an acting general manager with TEPCO’s on-site nuclear power division, said his understanding was a “personal knowledge” and did not shared it with colleagues. He explained, “I, in fact, knew it [the criteria]. I learned it while working in the field of nuclear technology with the company for over 20 years.” At the time of the accident, Okamura was in charge of pumping water into the unit #4 Spent Fuel Pool and was not involved with the meltdown investigation. http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201604120056.htmlhttp://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20160412/p2a/00m/0na/012000c
  • A small group of Japanese protesters file suit against licensing extensions for nukes. 76 plaintiffs from fourteen prefectures charge that the NRA’s statutes on extended lifespan are unacceptable. The focus is on the two Takahama units recently found to qualify for re-licensing by the NRA. The filing clearly attacks the NRA’s efficacy, similar to the latest series of suits getting wide news media coverage. The plaintiffs allege that the NRA has not strictly evaluated the problems accompanying the aging of nuclear reactors, or the danger of hydrogen explosions and other “disasters”. Sakae Kitamura, the head lawyer for the plaintiffs, asserted, “Five years ago we saw that nuclear plants are dangerous, causing such terrible disasters. We want to start a movement in the judiciary of halting nuclear plant operations.” Another lawyer representing the group says, “In a serious accident at the Takahama reactors, there is a danger of radiation damage from the effects of a westerly wind.” http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20160414_28/http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/04/14/national/crime-legal/nuclear-protesters-sue-nra-halt-takahama-reactor-restarts/#.Vw-A5ZBf0dVhttp://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20160414/p2a/00m/0na/020000c