• Only three of 80 fish caught outside the F. Daiichi port show any Cesium-134. Cs-134 is the unmistakable “fingerprint” of Fukushima contamination. 36 other fish contained detectible Cs-137 alone, indicating that it was residuals from the post-WWII nuclear bomb tests in the Pacific. Regardless, none of the fish had combined Cesium concentrations greater than Japan’s 100 Becquerel per kilogram limit. The fish highest in Cesium was a “Sebastes Cheni” (rockfish) at 55 Bq/kg. http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/nu/fukushima-np/f1/smp/2016/images/fish02_160415-e.pdf
  • Tokyo says releasing Fukushima’s tritiated water to the sea is the way to go. The Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry reports that discharging tritiated water into the ocean is the fastest and least costly way to resolve wastewater buildup at F. Daiichi. The ministry has been studying ways to dispose of tritium, which cannot be removed by the plant’s “ALPS” multi-nuclide elimination technology. METI considered five methodologies including burial, vaporization, and releasing tritium into the atmosphere as hydrogen gas. The sea-release option will be cautious, taking as long as eight years. The cost is estimated at between $30 and $40 million. http://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20160419/p2a/00m/0na/019000c
  • A small contaminated water leak is found at F. Daiichi. About 2.7 liters fell in drops from a pipe connected to a waste water storage tank. It appears the tank was not storing fully-treated liquid. The water tested at 260,000 Becquerels per liter of beta-emitting Strontium, and 6.200 Bq/l of gamma-emitting Cesium. The leak was discovered Wednesday evening. http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0002892928
  • The NRA will issue twice-daily reports on the unaffected nukes on Kyushu Island. Due to radiophobic concerns proffered by antinuclear groups and broadcast by Japan’s news media, the Nuclear Regulation Authority will provide assurance of nothing bad happening every day at 10am and 8pm.  This will not only address the operating units at Sendai, but also those that remain shuttered at Genkai, Ikata, and Shimane stations. http://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2016/04/407519.html
  • The NRA says Takahama #1 and #2 meet the nation’s new safety regulations. The two units will be the first to restart that were built more than 40 years ago. The agency officially passed the two units on Wednesday. Wednesday’s approval came after a 30-day period of soliciting public opinions on the preliminary decision, announced in February.  Most were negative, with some claiming the NRA underestimated the size of possible quakes, while others said the restarts should not be allowed until actual tests on upgraded electric cables were done. The next step will be for Kansai Electric to meet their earthquake commitments and prove the facility has not deteriorated enough to be denied restart. The company says it could take three more years before the units actually restart. The antinuclear-friendly Japan Times says that allowing the restart of the two units could “stoke concern over the efficacy of the strict new safety standards amid renewed public worries over the safety of nuclear plants after two deadly earthquakes rocked the Kyushu area last week.” http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20160420_13/http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/04/20/national/aging-takahama-reactors-road-operating-beyond-40-year-limit/#.Vxd_BJBf0dV
  • Two politicians share their fears of the Takahama station with the Press. Maizuru Mayor Ryozo Tatami said, “At present, has the safety of the plant been confirmed? We need scientific and technological explanations… We also need documentation from when the plant was originally built that proves it’s possible to operate the reactor for 60 years, especially since the core cannot be replaced.” Obviously, the mayor doesn’t know that the core gets regularly replaced. About a third of the fuel cells are removed and new ones inserted every 12-14 months. Meanwhile, Governor Taizo Mikazuki of Shiga Prefecture added his concerns. A tiny part of Shiga lies within the 30km EPZ. He is nervous about running “old” reactors that could leak radiation into Lake Biwa, Japan’s largest freshwater lake. In addition, Mikazuki says he is concerned about more nuclear waste being generated by the two units. http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/04/21/national/fears-grow-takahama-reactors-near-restart/#.VxkHUJBf0dV
  • At least eleven Kyushu residents have died from post-quake complications. This brings the total morbidity caused by last week’s severe quakes to 58. The prefecture calls the reason “economy class syndrome” – deaths caused by blood clots due to prolonged physical inactivity. The reason we mention this in our Fukushima Update is two-fold. First, we can see that post-quake complications leading to death are not only due to the Fukushima evacuation. In addition, the quake of March 11, 2011, was at least 50 times more powerful than the Kyushu quake, so having at least 50 times more “related” Fukushima deaths should come as no surprise. Antinuclear citizens are trying to use the Kyushu quake as a crutch to block restart of Ikata unit #3. A civic group in Matsuyama City urged Ehime Prefecture and Shikoku Electric to not reboot reactors due to fears following the deadly Kyushu quakes. Tsukasa Wada, a member of the group, said “We can’t rule out the possibility that a big quake will hit near Ikata nuclear plant.” (Aside – Of course these people ignore the fact that the March, 2011 Tohoku quake, 50 times more powerful, caused no damage to any of the fourteen nuclear units on the coast. F. Daiichi succumbed to a massive tsunami…not the quake! Japan’s antinuclear fanatics NEVER accept this fact.) http://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20160420/p2a/00m/0na/018000chttp://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/04/20/national/aging-takahama-reactors-road-operating-beyond-40-year-limit/#.VxeNGJBf0dUhttp://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2016/04/407711.html