The lull in Japanese reports concerning Fukushima Daiichi continues. There has been but one item of significance this week, which relates to our coverage topic because of the post-Fukushima nuclear moratorium mandated by the deposed Democratic Party of Japan regime.

  • Another smaller Japanese nuke will be scrapped. On Tuesday, Shikoku Electric Power Co. announced it will decommission Ikata unit #1, a 566 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor plant. It will reach its 40 year licensing limit in September of 2017, and the company believes it could not recoup the estimated $1.59 billion cost of upgrading to meet Japan’s post-Fukushima standards. There is no word on the fate of the similarly-sized unit #2 at Ikata station, which will reach its 40 year licensing limit in 2014. Ikata #1 is the sixth Japanese nuke to suffer decommissioning plans, all of which had outputs less than 600 MWe. The six units are Mihama-1 and -2 (Kansai Electric Power Co., Fukui Prefecture), Genkai-1 (Kyushu Electric Power Co., Saga Prefecture), Tsuruga-1 (Japan Atomic Power Co., Fukui Prefecture) and Shimane-1 (Chugoku Electric Power Co., Shimane Prefecture). As a result of these decommissioning plans, the maximum number of Japanese nukes that could possibly be restarted stands at 42. http://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2016/05/410415.htmlhttp://www.japantoday.com/category/national/view/6th-nuclear-reactor-scrapped-under-stricter-safety-ruleshttp://www.jaif.or.jp/en/shikoku-electric-power-to-decommission-ikata-1-reducing-japans-npps-to-42/ (It is interesting to note that Shimane Electric Co. estimates that decommissioning could take up to 30 years, which positively parallels the estimated 30-40 years Tepco estimates for F. Daiichi. The Tepco estimate has been constantly bemoaned by Japan’s Press, the international news media, and the world’s antinuclear community for five years. Yet a similar estimation of decommissioning time for Ikata #1 has generated nothing negative from any of them. There is a double-standard at work, to be sure.)