• Tokyo’s evacuation order is lifted for all of Kawauchi Village. The full cancellation of the mandate has been a sporadic process, with most of the village re-opened in October, 2014. But the two eastern-most districts – Ogi and Kainosaka – remained restricted until Tuesday. Only 51 people lived in the districts before the 2011 evacuation, so only a handful are expected to make a quick return. Those continuing their estrangement complain that the forests are not decontaminated, going shopping or seeing a doctor will be difficult, and they are skittish about the effects of low-level radiation exposure. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20160614_02/m
  • Fukushima Prefecture petitions Tokyo to upgrade recovery and restoration. The petition calls the five-year period starting in 2016 as “the moment of truth”. It says large sums of money should be designated in the national budget for measures related to the recovery, including reactor decommissioning, water decontamination, rebuilding the lives of evacuees, and dispelling false rumors. The prefecture also wants Tokyo to listen to local residents concerning revision of the geographical areas designated as “difficult to return” zones. Finally, the prefecture wants continual upgrading of the working conditions at F. Daiichi, and further improvement in information disclosure. http://www.jaif.or.jp/en/fukushima-prefecture-presents-petition-to-government-concerning-recovery-and-restoration/
  • Fukushima peaches are selling very well in Thailand. Following Fukushima Governor Masao Uchibori’s visit to the country on June 7th, orders for the fruit rose from 1.3 tons in 2015, to more than 20 tons for this year. The governor said, “Not only does this mean that many Thai people will get the chance to enjoy delicious Fukushima peaches, but it also ought to have the knock-on effect of introducing the fruit throughout the whole Southeast Asian region. Besides being safe, they are all delicious and will bring smiles to people’s dinner tables.” http://www.jaif.or.jp/en/peaches-from-fukushima-selling-well-in-thailand-thanks-to-governors-visit/
  • Tepco’s 2011 delay in reporting Fukushima meltdowns was due to Prime Minister “pressure”. Aside – This is a further verification of this writer’s reporting five years ago. – End aside. The conclusion comes from an investigative panel set up by Tokyo. The third-party commission is yet another in a five-year history of panels set up to investigate Tepco’s handling of the nuke accident. Here’s the finding… then-Tepco president Masataka Shimizu told a company vice president not to use the words “core meltdown” in a news conference 3 days after the accident onset. Shimizu told the panel he was instructed to do this by the office of then-PM Naoto Kan. However, the panel has not involved the office staff of the deposed PM, and Tepco officials could not remember which person in Naoto Kan’s staff passed along the order. They can only say the ban was conveyed through a public relations officer. Regardless, it is clear that the order to not use the term “meltdown” came from the PM and was intended to downplay the severity of the situation. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20160616_32/http://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2016/06/416780.html