• Iitate evacuation to end March 31, 2017. Tokyo has informed the village assembly of their intent to lift the evacuation advisory for all but the Nagadoro District. The entire municipality was subject to the Tokyo-mandated evacuation order in March, 2011. Last June, decontamination was completed in the village residential areas. The exposure level is currently 0.8 microsieverts per hour. This equates to 0.7 millisieverts per year, which is less than Japan’s decontamination goal of one mSv/yr. http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0002997896
  • Tokyo considers using rural radioactive soil for road building. Soils that have decayed below the 8,000 Becquerels per kilogram national standard will be used. The material will be covered with uncontaminated soil and topped with asphalt. The total top coverage will be between 50 and 100 centimeters (20-40 inches). The Environment Ministry estimates that the radiation level above the finished roads will be less than 0.01 mSv/yr. They plan to begin a verification project in Minamisoma as early as this summer. The material will also be used for raising the ground level in the construction of roads, seawalls, railways and other public works projects. The ministry says they expect public outcry if and when the Fukushima soil is used in other prefectures. A ministry official said, “Fierce resistance would likely arise if the contaminated earth were used in prefectures other than Fukushima Prefecture.” http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0002999444http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201606080056.html
  • All tsunami debris has been removed from the Fukushima evacuation zone. Tokyo the material had been shipped to temporary storage sites by the end of March. The debris included vehicles, logs and concrete fragments from the eleven evacuated municipalities. The materials will be either incinerated or recycled. However, Tokyo needs to continue disposal of the 8,400 homes damaged by the tsunami. Only about 3,000 of them have been demolished and the debris shipped to state-designated sites. Of the evacuation zone’s estimated 1.16 million tons of tsunami materials, about 820,000 tons has been handled. It is also noted that the total estimated tsunami debris for the entire prefecture was 4 million tons. 3.72 million tons have been disposed of. http://www.fukushimaminponews.com/news.html?id=679
  • Tepco posts its latest Press handout on expanding ice wall operation to 95%. A graphic shows where there will be designed non-frozen gaps on the landside (west) to accommodate Nuclear Regulation Authority fears of dropping the groundwater level too low. http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/nu/fukushima-np/handouts/2016/images/handouts_160606_01-e.pdf
  • Fukushima InFORM posts the latest data on Pacific Ocean testing, and still no Fukushima Cesium. Their website says, “Results from 34 samples, collected in December – March, did not find any of the Fukushima fingerprint isotope, Cs-134, in coastal waters.” However, the concentration of Cs-137 continues a slow but steady increase, though still below 2 Becquerels per liter; roughly 5,000 times less than Canada’s drinking water standard. With respect to Pacific biota, Salmon tested in 2015 showed no Cs-134. There were typical levels of Cs-137 from nuclear bomb testing in the 1950s, at less than one Bq/kg. https://fukushimainform.ca/
  • Fukushima InFORM has posted a summary of international standards for Strontium (Sr-90). The article was spurred by a recent Associated Press report stating that farms near Chernobyl are marketing milk which has Sr-90 concentrations roughly 10 times greater than the national standards in Belarus. The author, Dr. Jonathan Kellogg, says he was initially alarmed by the AP report, but his fears were quelled when he found that the 3.7 Bq/liter limit in Belarus was eight times less than Canada, 13 times less than Japan, and more than 40 times less than the United States. Dr. Kellogg says, “I’ve learned that not all [national] limits are equal.” After comparing the Belarusian limits to the rest of the world, he provided a detailed explanation on how limits are set, stressing that they are all highly conservative. Dr. Kellogg points out that Japan’s arbitrary lowering of the limits for food radioactivity in 2012 was supposed “to provide a generous safety margin. [But] the new limits are based on the false assumption that most food products are contaminated with cesium following the [Fukushima Accident].” Regardless, a poll showed that 76% of Japan’s population still felt foods near F. Daiichi were unsafe, three months after the standards were revised. Thus, Dr. Kellogg feels that “…these varying thresholds from one nation to another do cause some concern among the public.” https://fukushimainform.ca/2016/06/06/radiation-and-food-safety-a-story-of-standards/
  • A Japanese Plutonium shipment arrives safely in the United States. The 331 kilogram transfer is part of anti-terrorism measures agreed upon at the 2014 security summit. A local citizen’s group, Savannah River Site Watch, said plutonium arrived at a US Dept. of Energy facility in South Carolina on Saturday. Governor Nikki Haley opposes the receipt of the Plutonium, and said in a written statement to DOE chief Ernest Moniz, “It is imperative to the safety of our citizens and our environment that South Carolina not allow this to happen.”  Because the Savannah facility wasn’t operational by a Jan. 1 deadline, the federal government was supposed to remove 1 metric ton of plutonium from South Carolina or pay daily fines for “economic and impact assistance” — up to $100 million yearly — until either the facility meets production goals or the plutonium is taken elsewhere for storage or disposal. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20160607_21/http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/japanese-plutonium-arrives-sc-haleys-objections-39655553
  • Japan’s antinuclear Press resurrects the Fukushima child thyroid cancer issue. Although only one of the 131 cases of thyroid anomalies was found to be malignant, the Press treats all of them as full-blown cancers. One of the prefectural medical review officials said, “It is difficult to conclude that thyroid cancer cases found so far were caused by the nuclear disaster. There were a spate of thyroid cancer cases in children aged between zero and 5 years in Chernobyl, but there is only one case in Fukushima Prefecture. That does not immediately lead to the conclusion that (the thyroid cancers in Fukushima Prefecture) were caused by radiation.” Further, Hokuto Hoshi, head of the panel and a senior member of the Fukushima Medical Association, said it is unlikely that any of the anomalies were caused by Fukushima accident radioactivity, but, “Concerns have been growing among Fukushima residents with the increase in the number of cancer patients. We’d like to further conduct an in-depth study.” None of the children from the latest screening were under the age of five in March, 2011, and their “tumors” ranged in size between 5.3 millimeters and 35.6mm. The highest estimated thyroid exposure to any of the children was 2.1 mSv, which is many times less than the Chernobyl exposures that were linked to thyroid cancer. More than 300,000 Fukushima children have been screened with state-of-the-art ultrasound beginning in 2011, and 173 have tested positive for the thyroid anomalies. http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201606070042.htmlhttp://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/06/07/national/30-fukushima-kids-diagnosed-thyroid-cancer-second-check-upping-total-131-radiation-unlikely-cause/#.V1a7qylf0dVhttp://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20160607/p2g/00m/0dm/011000c  (For a full, objective account of this issue, please go to our dedicated webpage “Fukushima Child Thyroid Cancer Issue” at http://www.hiroshimasyndrome.com/fukushima-child-thyroid-cancer-issue-updated/)
  • The Associated Press exploits one of the tested children. The AP makes it seem that there is some kind of muzzling of the kids who have tested positive, and this 21-year-old woman is the first to go public. The AP asserts that the Fukushima child thyroid cancer rate is “many times higher than what is generally found, particularly among children”, and the children keep their mouths shut because a Fukushima-exposed individual “carries a stigma in the only country to be hit with atomic bombs.” They also say “some researchers believe the prefecture’s high thyroid-cancer rate is related to the accident”, even though there has actually only been one speculative report published by a long-time antinuclear Japanese epidemiologist who has had absolutely no involvement with Fukushima Medical University’s thyroid screening program. At least the AP reports the young woman saying, “I can speak out because I’m the kind of person who believes things will be OK.” http://finance.yahoo.com/news/woman-breaks-silence-among-fukushima-thyroid-cancer-patients-070035067.html