• Tomioka Town begins preparation for repopulation. Tokyo plans to begin temporary home stays for two zones in Tomioka, which is located between 5-12km south of F. Daiichi and inside the mandated evacuation zone. The government wants to lift the current restrictions by next April. Decontamination efforts are nearly completed, two convenience stores have opened, and a medical facility will provide medical services beginning in October. Some assembly members called for the full resumption of the Futaba Police Station’s main office in Tomioka to dispel anxiety over public safety, while others requested the display of a town radiation dosage map showing radiation “hot spots”. One “difficult to return” zone in the town will not be affected by Tokyo’s repopulation plans. http://www.fukushimaminponews.com/news.html?id=702
  • There is more than 700,000 tons of water in storage at F. Daiichi. Out of the roughly 707,000 tons in storage, nearly 670,000 tons have been run through the multi-nuclide removal systems, of which almost 189,000 tons have been further processed to remove detectible levels of Strontium-90 so that only biologically-innocuous Tritium remains. Because of a popular aversion to radiation and the mere possibility of exposure, the purified water storage problem continues to amplify. One important point is that the current volume of water remaining in the basements of the four damaged units is roughly 60,000 tons, which is down from the 66,000 ton total in January. http://www.tepco.co.jp/en/press/corp-com/release/betu16_e/images/160729e0101.pdfhttp://www.tepco.co.jp/en/press/corp-com/release/betu16_e/images/160108e0201.pdf
  • Iodine Jelly will be stockpiled for infant ingestion in the unlikely event of another nuke accident. The jelly is strawberry flavored, and can be dissolved in hot water or milk for consumption. There currently are about 115,000 infants within 30 kilometers of Japan’s eleven nuclear stations. But, Tokyo will have 300,000 doses of the jelly stored around the nuke locations to cover a worst-case scenario. Previously, the plan was to have pharmacists dissolve iodine powder for infants after they have been evacuated. However, it has been decided that the protective measure could come too late for infants, whose thyroids are assumed to be more susceptible to small doses of radioactive iodine. The government has placed an order for the jelly and will begin distribution to municipalities in September. Tokyo will provide financial support for the communities to stock the medication. http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201608010008.html
  • Two more Press outlets report on unit #2’s non-melt-through. On Friday, the Asahi Shimbun and Kyodo News posted articles on Tepco’s unit #2 muon scan results. Kyodo News’ report contained rhetoric steeped in doubt, while the Asahi report was definite and indubious. In fact, the Asahi stated that the findings disproved prior speculations of a complete melt-through, “Most of the nuclear fuel inside the No. 2 reactor at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant apparently did not melt through the pressure vessel as previously believed… The latest finding negates past studies that have suggested that most of the nuclear fuel inside the reactor had melted through the vessel.” This brings the total number of Press outlets in Japan to report on finding the corium to four (out of more than 50). As yet, we have been unable to find any international Press coverage. http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201607290050.htmlhttp://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2016/07/423504.html
  • The Industry Ministry (METI) considers a new public fund for F. Daiichi decommissioning. Tepco will have repay any money to the national government over a long period of time. The scheme ensure steady progress in the decommissioning effort. It is estimated that total cost of decommissioning will be “tens of billions” of dollars. Tepco says they have been able to secure nearly $20 billion and the public fund would cover anything over that amount. This should provide assurance of the recovery of Fukushima Prefecture. However, METI says the creation of the fund would require yet another Tepco management reformation. The ministry plans to submit their proposal to the Diet (national congress) next year. http://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Economy/Policy-Politics/Public-fund-may-help-decomission-Fukushima?page=2
  • Restarting all qualified nukes could cost utilities $32 billion. The expense includes meeting Japan’s new nuke safety regulations and licensing extensions. The cost estimate does not include money spent for precautions against terrorist attack, which could add another $1 billion to the total. This is the third-such annual survey, and has shown a $1.5 increase since 2013. The utilities believe they can recoup the costs once the shuttered units are restarted. http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201607310028.html