• Two Tepco nuclear units could pass NRA safety tests by next March. Units 5 & 6 at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa (K-K) station are about ready for Nuclear Regulation Authority pre-start up screening. If they clear the NRA regulatory hurdles, K-K 5 & 6 might be the first Boiling Water Reactor nukes to restart in Japan. Tepco applied for the safety assessment in September of 2013, and has invested huge sums of money to install accident-mitigation technology such as filtered venting systems to strip radioactive material from atmospheric releases. It is believed that filtered exhaust technology would have greatly reduced to amount of contamination produced by the F. Daiichi accident. But, merely passing the NRA regulatory tests will not guarantee restarts. Niigata Governor Hirohiko Izudima has remained firm in his reluctance to discuss restarts. The approval of the home prefecture’s governor is needed to restart nukes in Japan. Izumida says he will “not talk about restarting” reactors until a wholly independent assessment of the F. Daiichi accident is carried out. In other words, the numerous studies to date have not satisfied the governor, and what might sate his definition of a sufficient investigation is unknown. http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/08/24/national/two-tepco-kashiwazaki-kariwa-reactors-may-pass-geared-safety-checks-march/#.V72QxNLr0dUhttp://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2016/08/430069.html (Comment – Once again, Japan’s antinuclear Press fails to make correct statements. Japan Times reports, “Currently, two reactors at Kyushu Electric Power Co.’s Sendai plant and another reactor at Shikoku Electric Power Co.’s Ikata plant are operating in Japan after passing the safety checks. They are all BWRs.” In fact, none of the three are BWRs! They are all Pressurized Water Reactor systems. A retraction is in order, but it is unlikely to happen because the falsehood promotes the antinuclear agenda behind all Japan Times nuclear power reporting.)
  • 10,000 tons of moderately contaminated water remains in F. Daiichi trenches. The water is believed to have come from the March, 2011 tsunami, and mixed with other contaminated waters from basement leakage and/or rain run-off. A Tepco official explained, “Compared with around 70,000 tons of highly contaminated water that remain in the basements of the reactor buildings, (the water in the trenches) has a low level of concentration and thus poses little threat in terms of radiation exposure and the environment.” The water is in 17 cable trenches connected to the four damaged units, and eleven others that are not so attached. The Cesium radioactivity in the 28 trenches is as high as several thousand Becquerels per liter, but the radioactive level in the basements of the four damaged units measure in the millions of Bq/l range. There are roughly 40 additional trenches that cannot be sampled and analyzed because of debris blockage. It should be noted that Japan’s Press continues to arbitrarily call any water containing detectible F. Daiichi contamination “toxic”. http://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20160823/p2g/00m/0dm/074000chttp://english.kyodonews.jp/news/2016/08/430011.html