• Almost 100% of Fukushima rice harvested in 2015 had no detectible contamination. Of the more than 10 million bags tested that year, 99.99% contained no detectible radioactive Cesium. None of the few with detectible radiocesium exceeded the national marketing standard of 100 Becquerels per kilogram. 2015 was the first harvest where no tested bags exceeded the limit. Fukushima Prefecture found 71 bags (0.0007%) over the limit in 2012, 28 bags (0.0003%) in 2013 and two bags (0.00002%) in 2014. The prefecture says one reason for the historically-low percentage of above-standard tests is the use of potassium chloride-based fertilizer that retards absorbance of Cesium. http://www.fukushimaminponews.com/news.html?id=719
  • 99% of Fukushima-area fish and shell-fish have no detectible F. Daiichi radioactive Cesium. In Tepco’s latest monthly data posting, only one of 89 caught fish showed barely detectible Cesium-134; the “fingerprint” isotope for F. Daiichi contamination. The one stone flounder recorded less than one Becquerel per kilogram above minimum detectability. The fish was taken 15 kilometers from F. Daiichi, offshore of Odaka ward in Fukushima Prefecture. Meanwhile, five of the seventeen fish caught inside the F. Daiichi break-wall contained detectible Cs-134, but only two (a marbled sole and a greenling) contained more than the 100 Bq/kg limit for marketing in Japan. https://www4.tepco.co.jp/en/nu/fukushima-np/f1/smp/2016/images/fish02_160824-e.pdfhttps://www4.tepco.co.jp/en/nu/fukushima-np/f1/smp/2016/images/fish01_160824-e.pdf (Comment – It is important to note that the limit for radio-Cesium contamination in the United States is 1,200 Bq/kg.)
  • Okuma Town will offer its municipal property for the temporary contaminated rural waste facility. Okuma is one of the two F. Daiichi host communities, along with Futaba. The town office says they will offer 95 hectares of municipally-owned land to the Environment Ministry for the interim storage site. This will be about 10% of the total Okuma land area that Tokyo wants to use for the facility. The town expects to show the plan to the municipal assembly in September and then explain it to townspeople. Among the land plots to be offered to the ministry are schoolyards, including a 1-hectare tract inside the Fureai Park Okuma sport facility, as well as community halls and municipal housing. The ministry says they would like to purchase the land once the formal offer is made, but the Town office has yet to decide on a leasing option which will allow the property to be re-used after the 30-year facility closes. http://www.fukushimaminponews.com/news.html?id=720
  • A miniscule cooling water leak at Ikata unit #2 makes headlines. Ikata #2 staff found a three centimeter long crack on a pipe. Owner Shikoku Electric Company says that about 10 milliliters (one-third ounce) of radioactive liquid had oozed from the crack. Tests show that the leaked water contained boric acid, which is used in reactor coolant to assist in power-level control. Unit #2 has been shuttered since January, 2012. Unit #3 is currently at full power and preparing for commercial operation, but the company says there is no indication of a similar issue there. http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20160901_27/
  • Is being antinuclear more important than a governor’s possible political impropriety? It seems to be that way with Japan’s Press. Niigata Governor Hirohiko Izumida announced he will not seek a fourth consecutive term in office, citing his displeasure with the Niigata Nippo, a local daily newspaper, over a dispute involving a shipping company funded by the prefecture. However, Japan’s Press makes the fact that the governor is antinuclear the lead in the posted articles. For example, the Mainichi Shimbun headline reads, “Niigata Pref. nuclear power opponent governor won’t stand for re-election”. Another news outlet, Japan Times, runs the headline, “Governors’ moves muddle reactor restart bids”. Even the nuclear-neutral Yomiuri Shimbun makes the governor’s antinuclear stance the focus of its report. Why are they shifting journalistic focus? Because the only other person to have declared himself a gubernatorial candidate is Nagaoka Mayor Tamio Mori, who is said to be pronuclear. Thus, the prefecture’s antinuclear demographic is scrambling to find an opponent to Mori that will support their “no-nukes” agenda. http://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20160831/p2a/00m/0na/008000chttp://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/08/31/national/governors-moves-muddle-reactor-restart-bids/#.V8bUzNLr0dUhttp://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0003184399
  • At long last, a Japanese news source posts a wholly-objective report on the Kagoshima governor wanting to immediately shut Sendai station. Japan Atomic Industrial Forum reports that Gov. Satoshi Mitazono claims that “safety in the event of an earthquake had not been fully ascertained.” However, JAIF states the Nuclear Regulation Authority has inspected and reasserted that the Kumamoto earthquake in April in no way compromised safety at Sendai. In fact, NRA Chairman Shunichi Tanaka responded to the Governor’s plea to shut down the station until another inspection can be effected, saying, “What would be inspected again?” JAIF adds that all safety inspections can be made with equal confidence if the plant is operating or not. http://www.jaif.or.jp/en/kagoshima-governor-asks-for-temporary-suspension-of-operation-of-sendai-npps/